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Browse All : Images by J. & G. Pickett

1-50 of 54
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Herschel.
Moon, F. G.
Herschel.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Herschel : Diameter 34,201 miles; distance from the sun 1,795,991,709 miles; revolutions round the sun 83 yr. 150 d. 18 h.; progressions per hour 15,450 miles; of its orbit inclination 16 1/2 min.; eccentricity 83,818,933 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Herschel, or Uranus, according to its first name, after the British amateur astronomer and telescope-maker William Herschel, who discovered the planet on March 13,1781. Features astronomical symbol.
Saturn.
Moon, F. G.
Saturn.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Saturn : Diameter 78,730 miles; distance from the sun 907,089,032 miles; revolutions round the sun 29 yr. 174 d. 2 h.; progressions per hour 22,072 miles; of its orbit inclination 2 deg. 30 min.; eccentricity 50,949,376 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Saturn. Features astronomical symbol.
Jupiter.
Moon, F. G.
Jupiter.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Jupiter : Diameter 89,069 miles; distance from the sun 494,499,108 miles; revolutions round the sun 11 yr. 315 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 29,894 miles; of its orbit inclination 1 deg. 19 min.; eccentricity 23,823,978 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Jupiter. Features astronomical symbol.
Ceres.
Moon, F. G.
Ceres.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Ceres : Diameter 1,024; distance from the sun 262,903,570 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 44,871 miles; of its orbit inclination 10 deg. 38 min.; eccentricity 20,598,231 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the dwarf planet Ceres, or asteroid, the largest in the asteroid belt. Ceres was the first asteroid to be discovered, by Giuseppe Piazzi at Palermo Astronomical Observatory on January 1, 1801. It was originally considered a planet, but was reclassified as an asteroid in the 1850s after many other objects in similar orbits were discovered. Features astronomical symbol.
Pallas.
Moon, F. G.
Pallas.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Pallas : Diameter 2,099; distance from the sun 262,021,240 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 17 h.; progressions per hour 44,874 miles; of its orbit inclination 34 deg. 48 min.; eccentricity 64,516,665 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the minor planet Pallas, or asteroid, the third largest in the asteroid belt and the second asteroid to be discovered, by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 28, 1802, following the discovery of Ceres the year before. It is named after Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. Features astronomical symbol.
Juno.
Moon, F. G.
Juno.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Juno : Diameter 1,425; distance from the sun 253,380,485 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 131 days; progressions per hour 45,469 miles; of its orbit inclination 13 deg. 4 min.; eccentricity 64,597,834 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the minor planet Juno, or asteroid in the asteroid belt. Juno was the third asteroid discovered, by German astronomer Karl Harding in 1804. Features astronomical symbol.
Vesta.
Moon, F. G.
Vesta.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Vesta : Diameter unknown; distance from the sun 225,435,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 3 yr. 240 d. 5 h.; progressions per hour 48,211 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 deg. 1/5 min.; eccentricity 20,915,050 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Vesta. Features astronomical symbol.
Mars.
Moon, F. G.
Mars.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mars : Diameter 4,218; distance from the sun 144,907,630 miles; revolutions round the sun 1 yr. 321 d. 23 h.; progressions per hour 55,223 miles; of its orbit 1 deg. 51 min.; eccentricity 13,495,827 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Mars. Features astronomical symbol.
Tellus.
Moon, F. G.
Tellus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Tellus, or the Earth : Diameter 7,964; distance from the sun 95,000,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 365 d. 6 h. 9 m.; progressions per hour 68,092 miles; of its orbit; eccentricity 1,579,679 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Tellus, or Earth, according to its Latin name. Features astronomical symbol.
Venus.
Moon, F. G.
Venus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Venus : Diameter 7,498; distance from the sun 68,791,752 miles; revolutions round the sun 224 d. 16 h. 19 m.; progressions per hour 80,149 miles; of its orbit inclination 3 deg. 23 1/2 min.; eccentricity 473,100 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Venus. Features astronomical symbol.
Mercury.
Moon, F. G.
Mercury.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mercury : Diameter 3,108; distance from the sun 36,814 miles; revolutions round the sun 87 d. 23 h. 16 m.; progressions per hour 109,561 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 degrees; eccentricity 7,565,940 miles.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the planet Mercury. Features astronomical symbol.
The orbits.
Moon, F. G.
The orbits.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
The orbits.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the orbits of the major and minor planets, as well as the comet of 1680. Features astronomical symbols.
Capricorn -- Aquarius -- Pisces.
Moon, F. G.
Capricorn -- Aquarius -...
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Capricorn; the goat, 51 stars -- Aquarius; the waterbearer, 108 stars -- Pisces; the fishes, 113 stars.
Note
Card in white suit (representing winter), showing the constellations Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces. Includes descriptive text: The signs in which the sun appears in winter. Features astrological symbols.
Herschel.
Moon, F. G.
Herschel.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Herschel : Diameter 34,201 miles; distance from the sun 1,795,991,709 miles; revolutions round the sun 83 yr. 150 d. 18 h.; progressions per hour 15,450 miles; of its orbit inclination 16 1/2 min.; eccentricity 83,818,933 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Herschel, or Uranus, according to its first name, after the British amateur astronomer and telescope-maker William Herschel, who discovered the planet on March 13,1781. Features astronomical symbol.
Saturn.
Moon, F. G.
Saturn.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Saturn : Diameter 78,730 miles; distance from the sun 907,089,032 miles; revolutions round the sun 29 yr. 174 d. 2 h.; progressions per hour 22,072 miles; of its orbit inclination 2 deg. 30 min.; eccentricity 50,949,376 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Saturn. Features astronomical symbol.
Jupiter.
Moon, F. G.
Jupiter.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Jupiter : Diameter 89,069 miles; distance from the sun 494,499,108 miles; revolutions round the sun 11 yr. 315 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 29,894 miles; of its orbit inclination 1 deg. 19 min.; eccentricity 23,823,978 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Jupiter. Features astronomical symbol.
Ceres.
Moon, F. G.
Ceres.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Ceres : Diameter 1,024; distance from the sun 262,903,570 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 44,871 miles; of its orbit inclination 10 deg. 38 min.; eccentricity 20,598,231 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the dwarf planet Ceres, or asteroid, the largest in the asteroid belt. Ceres was the first asteroid to be discovered, by Giuseppe Piazzi at Palermo Astronomical Observatory on January 1, 1801. It was originally considered a planet, but was reclassified as an asteroid in the 1850s after many other objects in similar orbits were discovered. Features astronomical symbol.
Pallas.
Moon, F. G.
Pallas.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Pallas : Diameter 2,099; distance from the sun 262,021,240 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 17 h.; progressions per hour 44,874 miles; of its orbit inclination 34 deg. 48 min.; eccentricity 64,516,665 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the minor planet Pallas, or asteroid, the third largest in the asteroid belt and the second asteroid to be discovered, by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 28, 1802, following the discovery of Ceres the year before. It is named after Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. Features astronomical symbol.
Juno.
Moon, F. G.
Juno.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Juno : Diameter 1,425; distance from the sun 253,380,485 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 131 days; progressions per hour 45,469 miles; of its orbit inclination 13 deg. 4 min.; eccentricity 64,597,834 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the minor planet Juno, or asteroid in the asteroid belt. Juno was the third asteroid discovered, by German astronomer Karl Harding in 1804. Features astronomical symbol.
Vesta.
Moon, F. G.
Vesta.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Vesta : Diameter unknown; distance from the sun 225,435,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 3 yr. 240 d. 5 h.; progressions per hour 48,211 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 deg. 1/5 min.; eccentricity 20,915,050 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the minor planet Vesta, or asteroid, the second-most massive - and the brightest - in the asteroid belt, surpassed only by Ceres, which is classified as a dwarf planet. Vesta was discovered by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 29, 1807. Features astronomical symbol.
Mars.
Moon, F. G.
Mars.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mars : Diameter 4,218; distance from the sun 144,907,630 miles; revolutions round the sun 1 yr. 321 d. 23 h.; progressions per hour 55,223 miles; of its orbit 1 deg. 51 min.; eccentricity 13,495,827 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Mars. Features astronomical symbol.
Tellus.
Moon, F. G.
Tellus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Tellus, or the Earth : Diameter 7,964; distance from the sun 95,000,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 365 d. 6 h. 9 m.; progressions per hour 68,092 miles; of its orbit; eccentricity 1,579,679 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Tellus, or Earth, according to its Latin name. Features astronomical symbol.
Venus.
Moon, F. G.
Venus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Venus : Diameter 7,498; distance from the sun 68,791,752 miles; revolutions round the sun 224 d. 16 h. 19 m.; progressions per hour 80,149 miles; of its orbit inclination 3 deg. 23 1/2 min.; eccentricity 473,100 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Venus. Features astronomical symbol.
Mercury.
Moon, F. G.
Mercury.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mercury : Diameter 3,108; distance from the sun 36,814 miles; revolutions round the sun 87 d. 23 h. 16 m.; progressions per hour 109,561 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 degrees; eccentricity 7,565,940 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the planet Mercury. Features astronomical symbol.
Comet of 1680.
Moon, F. G.
Comet of 1680.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Comet of 1680 : Distance of its tail 80,000,000 miles; distance from the sun at its nearest approach 580,000 miles; progression per hour 880,000 miles.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the comet of 1680.
Libra -- Scorpio -- Sagittarius.
Moon, F. G.
Libra -- Scorpio -- Sag...
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Libra; the balance, 51 stars -- Scorpio ; the scorpion, 44 stars -- Sagittarius; the archer, 69 stars.
Note
Card in yellow suit (representing autumn), showing the constellations Libra, Scorpio and Sagittarius. Includes descriptive text: The signs in which the sun appears in autumn. Features astrological symbols.
Herschel.
Moon, F. G.
Herschel.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Herschel : Diameter 34,201 miles; distance from the sun 1,795,991,709 miles; revolutions round the sun 83 yr. 150 d. 18 h.; progressions per hour 15,450 miles; of its orbit inclination 16 1/2 min.; eccentricity 83,818,933 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Herschel, or Uranus, according to its first name, after the British amateur astronomer and telescope-maker William Herschel, who discovered the planet on March 13,1781. Features astronomical symbol.
Saturn.
Moon, F. G.
Saturn.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Saturn : Diameter 78,730 miles; distance from the sun 907,089,032 miles; revolutions round the sun 29 yr. 174 d. 2 h.; progressions per hour 22,072 miles; of its orbit inclination 2 deg. 30 min.; eccentricity 50,949,376 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Saturn. Features astronomical symbol.
Jupiter.
Moon, F. G.
Jupiter.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Jupiter : Diameter 89,069 miles; distance from the sun 494,499,108 miles; revolutions round the sun 11 yr. 315 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 29,894 miles; of its orbit inclination 1 deg. 19 min.; eccentricity 23,823,978 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Jupiter. Features astronomical symbol.
Ceres.
Moon, F. G.
Ceres.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Ceres : Diameter 1,024; distance from the sun 262,903,570 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 44,871 miles; of its orbit inclination 10 deg. 38 min.; eccentricity 20,598,231 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the dwarf planet Ceres, or asteroid, the largest in the asteroid belt. Ceres was the first asteroid to be discovered, by Giuseppe Piazzi at Palermo Astronomical Observatory on January 1, 1801. It was originally considered a planet, but was reclassified as an asteroid in the 1850s after many other objects in similar orbits were discovered. Features astronomical symbol.
Pallas.
Moon, F. G.
Pallas.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Pallas : Diameter 2,099; distance from the sun 262,021,240 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 17 h.; progressions per hour 44,874 miles; of its orbit inclination 34 deg. 48 min.; eccentricity 64,516,665 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the minor planet Pallas, or asteroid, the third largest in the asteroid belt and the second asteroid to be discovered, by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 28, 1802, following the discovery of Ceres the year before. It is named after Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. Features astronomical symbol.
Juno.
Moon, F. G.
Juno.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Juno : Diameter 1,425; distance from the sun 253,380,485 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 131 days; progressions per hour 45,469 miles; of its orbit inclination 13 deg. 4 min.; eccentricity 64,597,834 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the minor planet Juno, or asteroid in the asteroid belt. Juno was the third asteroid discovered, by German astronomer Karl Harding in 1804. Features astronomical symbol.
Vesta.
Moon, F. G.
Vesta.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Vesta : Diameter unknown; distance from the sun 225,435,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 3 yr. 240 d. 5 h.; progressions per hour 48,211 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 deg. 1/5 min.; eccentricity 20,915,050 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the minor planet Vesta, or asteroid, the second-most massive - and the brightest - in the asteroid belt, surpassed only by Ceres, which is classified as a dwarf planet. Vesta was discovered by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 29, 1807. Features astronomical symbol.
Mars.
Moon, F. G.
Mars.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mars : Diameter 4,218; distance from the sun 144,907,630 miles; revolutions round the sun 1 yr. 321 d. 23 h.; progressions per hour 55,223 miles; of its orbit 1 deg. 51 min.; eccentricity 13,495,827 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Mars. Features astronomical symbol.
Tellus.
Moon, F. G.
Tellus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Tellus, or the Earth : Diameter 7,964; distance from the sun 95,000,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 365 d. 6 h. 9 m.; progressions per hour 68,092 miles; of its orbit; eccentricity 1,579,679 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Tellus, or Earth, according to its Latin name. Features astronomical symbol.
Venus.
Moon, F. G.
Venus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Venus : Diameter 7,498; distance from the sun 68,791,752 miles; revolutions round the sun 224 d. 16 h. 19 m.; progressions per hour 80,149 miles; of its orbit inclination 3 deg. 23 1/2 min.; eccentricity 473,100 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Venus. Features astronomical symbol.
Mercury.
Moon, F. G.
Mercury.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mercury : Diameter 3,108; distance from the sun 36,814 miles; revolutions round the sun 87 d. 23 h. 16 m.; progressions per hour 109,561 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 degrees; eccentricity 7,565,940 miles.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the planet Mercury. Features astronomical symbol.
The sun.
Moon, F. G.
The sun.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
The sun : Distance from the Earth 95,000,000 miles; diameter 886,150 miles; rotation on its axis 25 days, 14 hours. Engraved by J. & G. Pickett.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the sun. Features astronomical symbol.
Cancer -- Leo -- Virgo.
Moon, F. G.
Cancer -- Leo -- Virgo.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Cancer; the crab, 83 stars -- Leo; the lion, 95 stars -- Virgo; the virgin, 110 stars.
Note
Card in red suit (representing summer), showing the constellations Cancer, Leo and Virgo. Includes descriptive text: The signs in which the sun appears in summer. Features astrological symbols.
Herschel.
Moon, F. G.
Herschel.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Herschel : Diameter 34,201 miles; distance from the sun 1,795,991,709 miles; revolutions round the sun 83 yr. 150 d. 18 h.; progressions per hour 15,450 miles; of its orbit inclination 16 1/2 min.; eccentricity 83,818,933 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Herschel, or Uranus, according to its first name, after the British amateur astronomer and telescope-maker William Herschel, who discovered the planet on March 13,1781. Features astronomical symbol.
Saturn.
Moon, F. G.
Saturn.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Saturn : Diameter 78,730 miles; distance from the sun 907,089,032 miles; revolutions round the sun 29 yr. 174 d. 2 h.; progressions per hour 22,072 miles; of its orbit inclination 2 deg. 30 min.; eccentricity 50,949,376 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Saturn. Features astronomical symbol.
Jupiter.
Moon, F. G.
Jupiter.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Jupiter : Diameter 89,069 miles; distance from the sun 494,499,108 miles; revolutions round the sun 11 yr. 315 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 29,894 miles; of its orbit inclination 1 deg. 19 min.; eccentricity 23,823,978 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Jupiter. Features astronomical symbol.
Ceres.
Moon, F. G.
Ceres.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Ceres : Diameter 1,024; distance from the sun 262,903,570 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 14 h.; progressions per hour 44,871 miles; of its orbit inclination 10 deg. 38 min.; eccentricity 20,598,231 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the dwarf planet Ceres, or asteroid, the largest in the asteroid belt. Ceres was the first asteroid to be discovered, by Giuseppe Piazzi at Palermo Astronomical Observatory on January 1, 1801. It was originally considered a planet, but was reclassified as an asteroid in the 1850s after many other objects in similar orbits were discovered. Features astronomical symbol.
Pallas.
Moon, F. G.
Pallas.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Pallas : Diameter 2,099; distance from the sun 262,021,240 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 221 d. 17 h.; progressions per hour 44,874 miles; of its orbit inclination 34 deg. 48 min.; eccentricity 64,516,665 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the minor planet Pallas, or asteroid, the third largest in the asteroid belt and the second asteroid to be discovered, by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 28, 1802, following the discovery of Ceres the year before. It is named after Pallas Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom. Features astronomical symbol.
Juno.
Moon, F. G.
Juno.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Juno : Diameter 1,425; distance from the sun 253,380,485 miles; revolutions round the sun 4 yr. 131 days; progressions per hour 45,469 miles; of its orbit inclination 13 deg. 4 min.; eccentricity 64,597,834 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the minor planet Juno, or asteroid in the asteroid belt. Juno was the third asteroid discovered, by German astronomer Karl Harding in 1804. Features astronomical symbol.
Vesta.
Moon, F. G.
Vesta.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Vesta : Diameter unknown; distance from the sun 225,435,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 3 yr. 240 d. 5 h.; progressions per hour 48,211 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 deg. 1/5 min.; eccentricity 20,915,050 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the minor planet Vesta, or asteroid, the second-most massive - and the brightest - in the asteroid belt, surpassed only by Ceres, which is classified as a dwarf planet. Vesta was discovered by the German astronomer and physician Wilhelm Olbers on March 29, 1807. Features astronomical symbol.
Mars.
Moon, F. G.
Mars.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mars : Diameter 4,218; distance from the sun 144,907,630 miles; revolutions round the sun 1 yr. 321 d. 23 h.; progressions per hour 55,223 miles; of its orbit 1 deg. 51 min.; eccentricity 13,495,827 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Mars. Features astronomical symbol.
Tellus.
Moon, F. G.
Tellus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Tellus, or the Earth : Diameter 7,964; distance from the sun 95,000,000 miles; revolutions round the sun 365 d. 6 h. 9 m.; progressions per hour 68,092 miles; of its orbit; eccentricity 1,579,679 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Tellus, or Earth, according to its Latin name. Features astronomical symbol.
Venus.
Moon, F. G.
Venus.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Venus : Diameter 7,498; distance from the sun 68,791,752 miles; revolutions round the sun 224 d. 16 h. 19 m.; progressions per hour 80,149 miles; of its orbit inclination 3 deg. 23 1/2 min.; eccentricity 473,100 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Venus. Features astronomical symbol.
Mercury.
Moon, F. G.
Mercury.
1829
[Celestial Atlas, Game]
 
Author
Moon, F. G.
Full Title
Mercury : Diameter 3,108; distance from the sun 36,814 miles; revolutions round the sun 87 d. 23 h. 16 m.; progressions per hour 109,561 miles; of its orbit inclination 7 degrees; eccentricity 7,565,940 miles.
Note
Card in blue suit (representing spring), showing the planet Mercury. Features astronomical symbol.
1-50 of 54
1 2