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Browse All : Images by Guiljelmi Ianssonii

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Magni Dvcatvs Lithvaniae
Blaeu, Willem Janszoon,...
Magni Dvcatvs Lithvania...
1613
World Atlas
 
Author
[Blaeu, Willem Janszoon, 1571-1638, Strubicz, Maciej, about 1530-1604, Gerritsz., Hessel, approximately 1581-1632]
Full Title
Magni Dvcatvs Lithvaniae, Caeterarvmqve Regionvm Illi Adiacentivm Exacta Descriptio Illss.mi. ac Excellss.mi. Pricipis et Dni. D. Nicolai Christophori Radziwil. D.G. Olijcæ ac in Nieswies Ducis, S. Rom. Imperii Principis in Szylowiec ac Mir Comitis et S. Sepulchri Hierosolimitani Militis &c. Opera cura et impensis facta ac in lucem edita / Sculptum apud Heselum Gerardum.
Note
1 map : copperplate engraving on 4 sheets. Title at the top of the map, in a shield-shaped cartouche decorated with hanging fruit. Key of the different types of settlement in the bottom left, in a cartouche surmounted with the arms of the Duchy of Lithuania (the Vytis). Below, issuing from the bottom of the signature, is Blaeu's signature, which is flanked by two putti. Scale bars at the bottom, on a thick banner entwined around a large caliper. This sheet was the product of a cartographic endeavour that began in the mid-1580s, when Prince Nicolas Christophe Radziwill commissioned a survey of the Duchy of Lithuania from Maciej Strubicz, cartographer to the recently deceased King Stephen Báthory. Surviving correspondence suggests that Radziwill had intended to publish the resulting map as early as the 1590s, and while it has been speculated that a lost print appeared sometime before 1604, Blaeu’s is the earliest engraved version of the map to have survived. In its original state of 1613 it was accompanied by a Latin text below the map, two sectional studies of the Dniepr river, and a further Latin address to the reader, presented in a cartouche held by putti (for a copy of this state see Maps 9.Tab.15.). For some reason this address does not mention Strubicz, only Tomasz Makowski, who has often been mistaken for the cartographer, but was probably the author and/or courier of the drawing which was brought to Amsterdam for Gerritsz to engrave. After the initial run the plates remained in Blaeu’s stock. In 1631 the map was revised for publication in atlases, firstly by removing the Latin text and eventually the supplementary plans of the Dniepr. The reduced sheet remained in use for several decades in the atlases of Willem and his son Joan, who probably issued the impression used in the Klencke Atlas.
Nova Descrittione D'italia Di Gioann. Antonio Magino.
Blaeu, Willem Janszoon,...
Nova Descrittione D'ita...
1617
World Atlas
 
Author
[Blaeu, Willem Janszoon, 1571-1638, Magini, Giovanni Antonio, 1555-1617, Lastman, Pieter, 1583-1633]
Full Title
Nova Descrittione D'italia Di Gioann. Antonio Magino.
Note
1 map : copperplate engraving on 6 sheets, hand colour. Tablet in the top right corner, inscribed with Blaeu's dedication to Jacob van Dijck (or Dyck), Swedish Ambassador to the Dutch Republic between 1614 and 1620. Seated above this inscription is a personification of Italy, enthroned, like the Madonna, in the middle of a rich assortment of treasure curated by two putti, one half artistic, the other martial. Italy herself rests her left foot on a celestial globe, holds a laurel wreath and sceptre in each hand, and balances four crowns on her lap, including the papal crown and corno ducale, which represent the principal states of Italy. To the left of this group are the arms of the principal rulers of Italy: the Doge of Genoa, Cosimo II de' Medici (Tuscany), Philip III of Spain (Milan and Naples), and Paul V (Papal States). Completing this dense ensemble are four sea and river gods below the dedication, representing, from left to right, the Tuscan sea, the Tiber, Po, and the Gulf of Venice, whose deity is also accompanied by the Lion of St Mark. Sea populated with numerous ships, monstrous fishes and tritons. In the left half, off the coast of Lazio, Neptune travels across the sea in his chariot, while at the far left two tritons carry the arms of Corsica and Sardinia. Imprint in the bottom left corner of the map. Seven scale bars in the bottom right corner, in another richly decorated cartouche surmounted with a small map of the Roman Empire. Surrounding the map are various supplementary descriptions of Italy: six town prospects at the top (Rome, Milan, Naples, Venice, Genoa and Florence), two sets of six costume studies at the sides, and a brief national survey at the bottom, by Giovanni Antonio Magini.
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