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Robert Satcher's Self-Portrait
Robert Satcher's Self-P...
11/23/09
NASA
 
Year
2009
STS-114 insignia
STS-114 insignia
2005
 
View of the ISS during Flyaround
View of the ISS during ...
[International Space St...
06/03/1999
ISS
 
NASA Center
Johnson Space Center
Official photo of the 41-G crew
Official photo of the 4...
Official photo of the 4...
 
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-08321 (6 May 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, prepares to exercise using the Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED) in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-08337 (6 May 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, wearing squat harness pads, poses for a photo while using the Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED) equipment in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-08320 (6 May 2007) --- Cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov, Expedition 15 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, uses the short bar for the Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED) to perform upper body strengthening pull-ups. The IRED hardware is located in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-08322 (6 May 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, dons squat harness pads in preparation to exercise using the Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED) equipment in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-07566 (13 May 2007) --- Cosmonaut Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Expedition 15 commander, trims cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov's hair in the Unity node of the International Space Station. Yurchikhin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair. Kotov, flight engineer, and Yurchikhin represent Russia's Federal Space Agency.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-06911 (7 May 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, uses the short bar for the Interim Resistive Exercise Device (IRED) to perform upper body strengthening pull-ups. The IRED hardware is located in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS015-E-07565 (13 May 2007) --- Cosmonaut Fyodor N. Yurchikhin, Expedition 15 commander, trims cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov's hair in the Unity node of the International Space Station. Yurchikhin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair. Kotov, flight engineer, and Yurchikhin represent Russia's Federal Space Agency.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS014-E-19541 (17 April 2007) --- Astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer, adds the Expedition 14 patch to the Unity node's growing collection of insignias representing crews who have lived and worked on the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS014-E-19545 (17 April 2007) --- Astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (right), Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer; Sunita L. Williams, flight engineer; and cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin (left), flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, add the Expedition 14 patch to the Unity node's growing collection of insignias representing crews who have lived and worked on the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS014-E-19587 (17 April 2007) --- Cosmonaut Oleg V. Kotov (foreground), Expedition 15 flight engineer representing Russia's Federal Space Agency, and astronaut Sunita L. Williams, flight engineer, participate in a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) training session using the Robotic Onboard Trainer (ROBOT) simulator in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS008-E-22362 (28 April 2004) --- Cosmonaut Gennady I. Padalka, Expedition 9 commander representing Russia?s Federal Space Agency, works in the Unity node of the International Space Station (ISS).
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS008-E-19132 (24 March 2004) --- The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Beacon / Beacon Tester floats in the Unity node of the International Space Station.
STS-114 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS114-S-001 (March 2004) --- The STS-114 patch design signifies the return of the Space Shuttle to flight and honors the memory of the STS-107 Columbia crew. The blue Shuttle rising above Earth?s horizon includes the Columba constellation of seven stars, echoing the STS-107 patch and commemorating the seven members of that mission. The crew of STS-114 will carry the memory of their friends on Columbia and the legacy of their mission back into Earth orbit. The dominant design element of the STS-114 patch is the planet Earth, which represents the unity and dedication of the many people whose efforts allow the Shuttle to safely return to flight. Against the background of the Earth at night, the blue orbit represents the International Space Station (ISS), with the EVA crewmembers named on the orbit. The red sun on the orbit signifies the contributions of the Japanese Space Agency to the mission and to the ISS program. The multi-colored Shuttle plume represents the broad spectrum of challenges for this mission, including Shuttle inspection and repair experiments, and International Space Station re-supply and repair. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced.
STS-113 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS113-344-031 (23 November ? 7 December 2002) --- Astronaut John B. Herrington, STS-113 mission specialist, is pictured in the Unity node on the International Space Station (ISS). Various extravehicular activity (EVA) tools float near Herrington.
STS-113 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS113-339-027 (2 December 2002) --- Astronauts James D. Wetherbee, STS-113 mission commander, and Peggy A. Whitson, Expedition Five NASA ISS science officer, add the STS-113 patch to the growing collection of those representing Shuttle crews who have worked on the International Space Station (ISS). A location in the Unity node serves as one of the traditional posting sites for the patches.
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS112-316-008 (7-18 October 2002) --- Astronaut Jeffrey S. Ashby, STS-112 mission commander, floats in the Unity node on the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-112 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS112-314-010 (7-18 October 2002) --- Astronaut David A. Wolf, STS-112 mission specialist, floats in the Unity node on the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-110 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS110-353-012 (8-19 April 2002) --- Astronaut Ellen Ochoa, STS-110 mission specialist, poses by the speed limit signs in the Unity node on the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS106-709-059 (8-20 September 2000) ---The STS-106 crew members used a 70mm handheld camera to capture this view of the International Space Station (ISS) backdropped against the darkness of space. For orientation purposes, the picture should be held with the gibbous moon at upper left. The station component on the end in the upper right corner is the U.S.-built Unity node, which is connected with the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya. The FGB was linked in July with the Service Module or Zvezda (with the longer solar panels). On the bottom in this angle, next to the service module, is the Progress supply ship, which joined ISS in August.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS106-709-026 (8-20 September 2000) --- The STS-106 crew members used a 70mm handheld camera to capture this view of the International Space Station (ISS) over a moderately cloud-covered land area. The station component nearest the camera is the U.S.-built Unity node, which is connected with the Russian-built Functional Cargo Block (FGB) or Zarya. The FGB was linked in July with the Service Module or Zvezda, seen near the bottom of ISS in this angle. On the far end, next to the service module, is the Progress supply ship, which joined ISS in August.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS106-S-001 (April 2000) --- This is the crew patch for the STS-106 mission, which is the first Shuttle flight to the International Space Station since the arrival of its newest component, the Russian-supplied Service Module Zvezda (Russian for star). Zvezda is depicted on the crew patch mated with the already orbiting Node 1 Unity module and Russian-built Functional Cargo Block, called Zarya (sunrise), with a Progress supply vehicle docked to the rear of the Station. The International Space Station is shown in orbit with Earth above as it appears from the perspective of space. The Astronaut Office symbol, a star with three rays of light, provides a connection between the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the Space Station, much the same as the Space Shuttle Program is linked to the International Space Station during its construction and future research operations. Stylized versions of flags from Russia and the United States meet at the Space Station. They symbolize both the cooperation and joint efforts of the two countries during the development and deployment of the permanent outpost in space as well as the close relationship of the American and Russian crew members.
STS-106 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS106-319-022 (8-20 September 2000)--- Cosmonaut Yuri I. Malenchenko, mission specialist representing the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, works aboard the U.S.-built Unity node on the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-105 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS105-314-024 (10-22 August 2001) --- Astronaut Frederick W. (Rick) Sturckow (center), STS-105 pilot, is about to add his name to the log of visitors to the International Space Station (ISS) during a brief break in the orbital outpost's Unity node. Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-105 mission commander, is at right.
STS-105 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS105-304-025 (10-22 August 2001) --- Astronaut James S. Voss, outgoing Space Station flight engineer, performs a task at a work station in the Destiny laboratory as a "guest" arrives from the Space Shuttle Discovery. Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-105 mission commander, floats through the hatchway leading to the Unity node. A 35mm camera, equipped with a "fish-eye" lens, was used to record the image. Voss, who had spent the last five months aboard the orbital outpost with his two Expedition Two crew mates, later joined Horowitz and his crew when they returned to Earth on August 22.
STS-101 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS101-S-001 (March 2000) --- The STS-101 mission patch commemorates the third Space Shuttle flight supporting the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). This flight's primary tasks are to outfit the ISS and extend its lifetime, and to conduct a spacewalk to install external components in preparation for the docking of the Russian Service Module, Zvezda, and the arrival of the first ISS crew. The Space Shuttle is depicted in an orbit configuration prior to docking with the ISS. The ISS is depicted in the stage of assembly completed for the STS-101 mission, which consists of the United States-built Unity module and the Russian-built Zarya module. The three large stars represent the third ISS mission in the assembly sequence. The elements and colors of the border reflect the flags of the nations represented by the STS-101 crew members, the United States and Russia. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, it will be publicly announced.
STS-101 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS101-717-094 (19-29 May 2000) --- The seven crew members for STS-101 pose for an inflight crew portrait on the International Space Station. Pictured in Unity or Node 1 are (rear, from left) astronauts Mary Ellen Weber, James D. Halsell, Jr., Jeffrey N. Williams and Scott J. Horowitz; and (front) astronauts Susan J. Helms, cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev and astronaut James S. Voss. Usachev represents the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. After a two-man, 6-hour and 44-minute space walk, the international crew joined forces on the following day to begin preparations of the station's interior.
STS-101 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS101-395-008 (19-29 May 2000) --- STS-101 served as a preview opportunity for these two astronauts and cosmonaut, who have been assigned to future duty on the second expedition crew of the International Space Station. Pictured in the U.S.-built Node 1 or Unity are (from the left) cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev and astronauts James S. Voss and Susan J. Helms, all mission specialists.
STS-101 Shuttle Mission...
 
Description
STS101-348-018 (19-29 May 2000) --- Astronaut Susan J. Helms, mission specialist, carries a treadmill from the Space Shuttle Atlantis through the Node 1 or Unity during busy STS-101 intravehicular activity.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS098-S-010 (7 February 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the station using the Shuttle?s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS098-359-0021 (7-20 February 2001) --- Four STS-98 astronauts and the Expedition One commander are pictured in the Unity node aboard the International Space Station (ISS) during one of several days of joint activities. Standing in the foreground are astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell (left), STS-98 commander; and Robert L. Curbeam, mission specialist. Astronauts Thomas D. Jones and Marsha S. Ivins, both mission specialists, are near center of the frame; and astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd, is near the opposite hatch in the background.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS098-S-005 (7 February 2001) --- Reflected in nearby marsh waters, liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the station using the Shuttle?s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS098-S-009 (7 February 2001) --- Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis occurred at 6:13:02 p.m. (EST), February 7, 2001. Along with a crew of five, Atlantis is carrying the U.S. laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the International Space Station (ISS). Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the station using the Shuttle?s robotic arm. Three space walks are required to complete the planned construction work during the scheduled 11-day mission. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the orbiting outpost, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA?s Space Shuttle program.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS098-346-0032 (7-20 February 2001) --- Cosmonaut Sergei K. Krikalev, Expedition One flight engineer representing the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, carries the Vozdukh in the Unity node. Vozdukh is designed to maintain the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the cabin air within the medically permissible range for long-duration exposure. It provides the primary means of removing CO2 from the outpost's atmosphere, and its operation is based on the use of regenerated adsorbers of CO2.
STS-98 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS098-352-0019 (11 February 2001) --- Inside the Unity node, astronaut William M. (Bill) Shepherd (center), Expedition One commander, holds a document of receipt of the U.S. laboratory, called Destiny, as part of the International Space Station (ISS). Looking on are astronauts Kenneth D. Cockrell (left) and Mark L. Polansky, commander and pilot, respectively, for STS-98. The hatch to Destiny, not yet opened, is in the background.
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS096-383-021 (27 May - 6 June 1999) -- Astronauts Rick D. Husband and Tamara E. Jernigan adjust the hatch for the U.S.-built Unity node. The task was part of the overall effort by the seven-member STS-96 crew to prepare the existing portion of the International Space Station (ISS).
STS-97 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS097-702-061 (2 December 2000) --- The International Space Station (ISS) moves in position for docking with the Space Shuttle Endeavour, in this 70mm frame photographed by one of the STS-97 astronauts on the flight deck of the shuttle. Most of the station's components are clearly visible in the frame, with the Soyuz spacecraft docked at left to the Zvezda Service Module, which is linked to the Zarya or Functional Cargo Block (FGB). The Unity node is at right, sporting the additions from the recent STS-92 mission of the Z1 truss structure (largely obscured) and a Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA-3).
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS096-407-011 (27 May - 6 June 1999) --- Astronauts Kent V. Rominger, mission commander, and Julie Payette, mission specialist, participate in the overall chore of STS-96 of preparing International Space Station (ISS) for occupancy. The two are in the U.S.-built Unity node near the hatch leading to the Russian-built Zarya or FGB. Payette, an alumnus of the 1996 class of astronaut trainees, represents the Canadian Space Agency (CSA).
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS096-380-019 (27 May - 6 June 1999) --- The seven crew members for the STS-96 mission pose for the traditional inflight crew portrait in the hatch way of the U.S.-built Unity node for the International Space Station (ISS). From to left to right, bottom, are astronauts Daniel T. Barry, Julie Payette and Ellen Ochoa. On top are cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, along with astronauts Tamara E. Jernigan and Kent V. Rominger. Astronaut Rick D. Husband is between Rominger and Ochoa. Payette represents the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) and Tokarev is with the Russian Space Agency (RSA).
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS096-330-012 (30 May 1999) --- The U.S.-built Unity node occupies the attention of astronaut Daniel T. Barry as he participates in the May 30 space walk during which he and astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan performed external tasks on the International Space Station (ISS). Jernigan, standing on the end of Discovery's remote manipulator system (RMS), is reflected in Barry's helmet visor in this 35mm frame.
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS096-369-008 (27 May - 6 June 1999) --- Onboard the U.S.-built Unity node, astronauts Daniel T. Barry (left), mission specialist, and Rick D. Husband, pilot, repair the early communications system.
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS96-S-001 (February 1999) --- Designed by the crew members, this is the mission insignia for the STS-96 space flight, the second Space Shuttle mission dedicated to the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The crew patch highlights the major themes of the Station Program: Earth-directed research, the advancement of human space exploration, and international cooperation. The Space Shuttle Discovery is depicted shortly after reaching orbit as the crew prepares to carry out the first docking with the new Station. At this early stage in its construction, ISS consists of two modules: Zarya and Unity, shown orbiting Earth. The triangular shape of the patch represents building on the knowledge and experience of earlier missions, while the three vertical bars of the astronaut emblem point toward future human endeavors in space. The five-pointed star that tops the astronaut emblem in this depiction is symbolic of the five space agencies participating in the development of ISS: NASA, the Russian Space Agency, the European Space Agency, the National Space Development Agency of Japan, and the Canadian Space Agency. The blend of red, white, and blue is a tribute to the nationalities of the crew members who are from the United States, Canada, and Russia. NOTE: The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availablity has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.
STS-96 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS096-333-021 (3 June 1999) --- Backdropped against white clouds and blue ocean waters, the International Space Station (ISS) moves away from the Space Shuttle Discovery. The U.S.-built Unity node (left) and the Russian-built Zarya or FGB module (with the solar array panels deployed) were joined during a December 1998 mission. A portion of the work performed on the May 30 space walk by astronauts Tamara E. Jernigan and Daniel T. Barry is evident at various points on the ISS, including the installation of the Russian-built crane (called Strela). A STS-96 crew member aboard Discovery recorded this image with a 35mm camera on June 3, 1999.
STS-92 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS092-S-001 (November 1999) --- Designed by the crew members, the STS-92 patch symbolizes the second mission to carry U.S.-built elements to the International Space Station (ISS) for assembly. The black silhouette of the Space Shuttle Discovery stands out against the deep blue background of space in low Earth orbit. In the foreground in gray is a profile view of the ISS as it appears when the shuttle and crew arrive, with the station consisting of the Unity node, its two pressurized mating adapters (PMA), the Zarya functional cargo block, the Zvezda service module, and the Progress cargo vehicle. Following the shuttle's rendezvous and docking, the ISS configuration will be augmented by the two elements delivered by Discovery--the Z1 truss and PMA-3. These two elements, depicted in red, will be installed using the shuttle's robot arm and be connected to ISS during four spacewalks. The multi-national nature of both the STS-92 crew and the ISS are reflected in the multi-colored Astronaut Office symbol. The NASA insignia design for shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, it will be publicly announced.
STS-92 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS092-706-005 (11-26 October 2000) --- Silhouetted over Earth, the International Space Station (ISS) is seen in a configuration soon to be changed, once the approaching STS-92 crew adds its important new changes. If oriented with Earth's horizon on the left, the ISS elements, from the left, are Node 1 or Unity, the functional cargo block or Zarya, the service module or Zvezda and the Progress supply ship. In a matter of days, the crew went on to add the Z1 Truss structure and a third pressurized mating adapter (PMA-3).
STS-92 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS092-405-025 (11-26 October 2000) --- Not long before the link-up of the Space Shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station (ISS), a crew member onboard the shuttle used a 35mm camera to grab this oblique image of the station. This was one of the last looks at the complex in the represented configuration, as the seven-member team went about changing its appearance with the addition of important new pieces. Backdropped against the blackness of space, all the current elements are visible. Nearest the camera is the Progress supply ship, attached to the service module or Zvezda, which connects to the functional cargo block (FGB) or Zarya. At the top or far end in this view is the U.S.-built Unity Node 1. The nearest set of solar arrays belongs to Zvezda, with the further array serving the Zarya. Once the STS-92 crew completed its work, the addition of the Z1 Truss and a third pressurized mating adapter (PMA-3) changed the appearance considerably.
STS-92 Shuttle Mission ...
 
Description
STS092-702-059 (11-26 October 2000) --- Not long before the link-up of the Space Shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station (ISS), a crew member onboard the shuttle used a handheld 70mm camera to grab this image of the station. This was one of the last looks at the complex in the represented configuration, as the seven-member team went about changing its appearance with the addition of important new pieces. Backdropped against the blackness of space, all the current elements are visible, though this particular angle makes them difficult to delineate. Nearest the camera is the Progress supply ship, attached to the service module or Zvezda, which connects to the functional cargo block (FGB) or Zarya. At the top or far end in this vew is the U.S.-built Unity Node 1. Once the STS-92 crew completed its work, the addition of the Z1 Truss and a third pressurized mating adapter (PMA-3) changed the appearance considerably.
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