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Fires in the Amazon
Fires in the Amazon
On September 29, 2007, ...<a href="http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov"></a><a href="http://aqua.nasa.gov"></a><a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/natural_hazards_v2.php3?img_id=14549"></a><a href="http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Study/AmazonFire/amazon_fire.html"></a><a href="http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/subsets/?AERONET_Alta_Floresta"></a><a href="http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov"></a>
Aqua- MODIS
 
Fires in Brazil and Bolivia
Fires in Brazil and Bol...
Development and agricul...<A HREF="http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov" target="outlink"></A></A><A HREF="http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov" target="outlink"></A>
Aqua- MODIS
 
International Space Sta...
 
Description
ISS009-E-15488 (7 July 2004) --- Solimoes-Negro River confluence at Manaus, Amazonia is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 9 crewmember on the International Space Station (ISS). The largest river on the planet, the Amazon, forms from the confluence of the Solimoes (the upper Amazon River) and the Negro at the Brazilian city of Manaus in central Amazonas. At the river conjunction, the muddy, tan colored waters of the Solimoes meet the ?black? water of the Negro River. The unique mixing zone where the waters meet extends downstream through the rainforest for hundreds of kilometers, and is a famous attraction for tourists all over the world. It is the vast quantity of sediment eroded from the Andes Mountains that gives the Solimoes its tan color. By comparison, water in the Negro derives from the low jungles where reduced physical erosion of rock precludes mud entering the river. In place of sediment, organic matter from the forest floor stains the river the color of black tea.
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